VASSAR TEMPLE STEPS UP TO THE PLATE!

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This morning, Vassar Temple caught wind of an immediate need for food donations on behalf of the students at Morse Elementary School in Poughkeepsie. It seems as though a large number of families associated with the school lack adequate food year round. With the December holiday break at hand, it was anticipated that many students would lack access to school-based breakfasts and lunches. The school, which houses its own food pantry, was in need of donations!

This morning at Temple, our marvelous teens Edison D’Orio and Tara Lerman helped bag canned and nonperishable foods that you, Vassar Temple members, had generously donated in the recent weeks to our VT CAN JAM bin. Cereals, lentils, soups, pastas, juices and more ~~ amazing!! Together we loaded up a car full of bags. Tomorrow the food will be delivered to the Morse School — just in time for the winter break. Thank you Vassar Temple.

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Torah Study Notes 12-12-15

NOTE TO READERS: THESE NOTES SHOULD BE READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH PLAUT’S THE TORAH A MODERN COMMENTARY. “RB” IS RABBI BERKOWITZ – THE LEADER OF OUR DISCUSSIONS. ALL ERRORS ARE MY OWN. COMMENTS ARE WELCOME. L. LEWIS.

December 12, 2015

p.277 Overview of this parsha by RB:  In our last portion Joseph was in jail and forgotten. Then Pharaoh has a dream about ears of corn and cows. Why are there two iterations of the same story?  Showing us the impact of famine on animal and vegetable? Joseph interprets seven years of plenty and seven years of famine. Pharaoh is impressed and chooses him to manage the process of building a reserve. Meanwhile back in Canaan there is famine and the brothers are sent to Egypt to buy food. Joseph recognizes them but they don’t recognize him. He interrogates them and sends them back with food but returns their money by putting it in their bags. See page 271 for the translation of Joseph’s Egyptian name. Note the evolution of Judah’s character as a human being throughout.

16 – The brothers enter Joseph’s house. They tell his houseman of the silver in their bags. They are told that “their god” replaced the money. Note the presumption of tolerance. The houseman knows that Joseph is a Hebrew but the brothers are unaware. Discussion of the merits of polytheism – particularly where woman had their own female deities. Some historians identify monotheisms as the greatest tragedy in the history of mankind! Note the modern female priestess movement. Particularistic religion vs universalist. Jews are particular in that they have their god but unlike Islam and Christianity they do not proselytize. There is no effort to make the religion universal. Note the Pope’s recent encyclical on the Jews – not to be proselytized by Catholics – in recognition of the validity of Judaism.

24 When Joseph enters they bow down before him. He asks for their aged father. He sees Benjamin – his mother’s son. He weeps in an inner chamber and eats separately – because of his rank?  Or because of his emotional state? Note that the word for “abomination” is used later to describe homosexual acts. To eat with people of another culture is also considered taboo to an Egyptian of this era.  This is all believed to be a separately written piece – it is emotionally rich. Consider the musical – Joseph and His Coat of Many Colors –  much of which is taken directly from Torah. This is thought to be from the “J” author but there are likely other contributors. Joseph assumes that Benjamin may now be the favorite son – since Rachael is their mother.

33: They were seated before him – ate and drank. Now he again secretly returns their silver and this itme puts a silver goblet in the bag of Benjamin. Joseph is testing the brothers.

33:3  The goblet is found in Benjamin’s bag. The brothers know they are being framed but don’t know why. They go back to the city to plead their case with Joseph. What does “divination” mean here? Is there an invocation of another deity? Or could the practice somehow be reconciled with monotheism? The modern meaning of “to divine” would be “to figure out” or “to intuit.”

33: 14 ” Did you not know that a man like me practices divination.” J tries to separate out Benjamin again. But Judah offers all of them as slaves and implies that they all conspired to take the goblet. Have they perhaps recognized J and are “playing along” knowing that he would treat them mercifully?

Theologically this is about forgiveness and the spiritual growth of human beings. Taking responsibility for ones sins.  PC- There is a running theme here of “my god is better than your god.” Joseph derives his power from his God – apparently. But there is also the theme of forgiveness – not to mention that Joseph has saved the Egyptian people from starvation. Intelligence and charisma is its own reward. This was all part of God’s plan according to Joseph. CL This can be read as a miracle story which were very common in ancient cultures. It was very difficult to preserve food so the outcome was effectively miraculous.

Eight Nights of Mitzvot, Part VI

Melissa, Rachel and Brianna Erlebacher celebrate the sixth night of Chanukah by throwing a party and showcasing the Jewish value of Hachnasat Orchim (Welcoming Guests)!

Watch the Erlebacher’s Video!

Don’t forget….Annual Chanukah Service Friday TONIGHT at 7:00 p.m.

Our beautiful family-friendly Chanukah Menorah-Lighting Shabbat service, to which everyone is welcome and encouraged to bring a menorah and candles.

Activity ideas: Have a Chanukah party and invite people over! Invite someone who is single to dinner, services or out to coffee. Or you can help out The Birthday Project.

Watch for these videos every morning in your inbox, or check the  Vassar Temple YouTube Channel.

We hope that you will join in the celebration by lighting, and celebrating these mitzvot, in your own homes!

How to Light Chanukah Candles

You can also celebrate religious freedom by joining Women of the Wall’s “It’s My Right To Light” Campaign, which is fighting for the inclusion of women in Israel’s national Chanukiyah lighting ceremony at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

Don’t forget….Annual Chanukah Dinner and Service Friday 12/11
5:30 p.m. Annual pot-luck dinner. Bring a dairy dish for 12; Sisterhood will provide latkes, applesauce, challah, salad and beverages. Cost: $18 per family or $6 per individual. RSVP by Tuesday 12/8 to Roni Stein 223-5804 or roniagt99@aol.com Send your check to Vassar Temple Sisterhood with “Chanukah Dinner” on the memo line.

7:00 p.m. Our beautiful family-friendly Chanukah Menorah-Lighting Shabbat service, to which everyone is welcome and encouraged to bring a menorah and candles.

More Chanukah resources:

Union for Reform Judaism Chanukah Resources Page

My Jewish Learning Chanukah Resource Page

May your Chanukah be filled with light and joy, and may we all bring light and joy to those who need it most!

Eight Nights of Mitzvot, Part V

Rabbi Berkowitz shares eight things you may not know about Chanukah to fulfill the mitzvah of Talmud Torah (Jewish Learning)

Watch Rabbi Berkowitz’s Video!

Activity ideas: Play “Torah Jeopardy” (give the questions to which Torah names and places are the answer); make a play of the Torah portion of the week (usually part of the Joseph story, very dramatic!); make Torah scrolls with citations or pictures of our favorite verses of Torah in them, gift to one another; draw a picture of how you imagine your favorite biblical hero or heroine looked and tell his/her story to your family; download and play “Middot-opoly  – it’s a game for learning Jewish values! 

Watch for these videos every morning in your inbox, or check the  Vassar Temple YouTube Channel.

We hope that you will join in the celebration by lighting, and celebrating these mitzvot, in your own homes!

How to Light Chanukah Candles

You can also celebrate religious freedom by joining Women of the Wall’s “It’s My Right To Light” Campaign, which is fighting for the inclusion of women in Israel’s national Chanukiyah lighting ceremony at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

Don’t forget….Annual Chanukah Dinner and Service Friday 12/11
5:30 p.m. Annual pot-luck dinner. Bring a dairy dish for 12; Sisterhood will provide latkes, applesauce, challah, salad and beverages. Cost: $18 per family or $6 per individual. RSVP by Tuesday 12/8 to Roni Stein 223-5804 or roniagt99@aol.com Send your check to Vassar Temple Sisterhood with “Chanukah Dinner” on the memo line.

7:00 p.m. Our beautiful family-friendly Chanukah Menorah-Lighting Shabbat service, to which everyone is welcome and encouraged to bring a menorah and candles.

More Chanukah resources:

Union for Reform Judaism Chanukah Resources Page

My Jewish Learning Chanukah Resource Page

May your Chanukah be filled with light and joy, and may we all bring light and joy to those who need it most!

Eight Nights of Chanukah, Part IV

Shira and Dan Teich celebrate the fourth night of Chanukah, and the Jewish value of Kibud Av Va’Em (Honoring Your Parents)

Watch Shira and Dan’s Video!

Activity ideas:  Give gifts to parents and grandparents; adopt an elder who doesn’t have children for the evening or more; tell stories about family, maybe craft projects honoring family who have died; make a coupon book of things you will do for a parent or grandparent in the coming year; visit the graves of parents or grandparents who have died and leave a stone; buy a gift from Yad L’Kashish (Lifeline to the Elderly) in Israel or volunteer with or donate to Friends of Seniors!

Watch for these videos every morning in your inbox, or check the  Vassar Temple YouTube Channel.

We hope that you will join in the celebration by lighting, and celebrating these mitzvot, in your own homes!

How to Light Chanukah Candles

You can also celebrate religious freedom by joining Women of the Wall’s “It’s My Right To Light” Campaign, which is fighting for the inclusion of women in Israel’s national Chanukiyah lighting ceremony at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

Don’t forget….Annual Chanukah Dinner and Service Friday 12/11
5:30 p.m. Annual pot-luck dinner. Bring a dairy dish for 12; Sisterhood will provide latkes, applesauce, challah, salad and beverages. Cost: $18 per family or $6 per individual. RSVP by Tuesday 12/8 to Roni Stein 223-5804 or roniagt99@aol.com Send your check to Vassar Temple Sisterhood with “Chanukah Dinner” on the memo line.

7:00 p.m. Our beautiful family-friendly Chanukah Menorah-Lighting Shabbat service, to which everyone is welcome and encouraged to bring a menorah and candles.

More Chanukah resources:

Union for Reform Judaism Chanukah Resources Page

My Jewish Learning Chanukah Resource Page

May your Chanukah be filled with light and joy, and may we all bring light and joy to those who need it most!

Eight Nights of Chanukah, Part III

Marsha and Glenn Tanzman celebrate the third night of Chanukah, and the Jewish value of Hoda’ah (Gratitude)

Watch Marsha and Glenn’s Video!

Activity ideas:  Write a thank you card to someone who isn’t expecting it; write a thank you card to another member of the household; make a list of things for which we are grateful, then make a “bouquet” of those things by making paper flowers and writing the items on them and use it to decorate the table next Shabbat; play the ABC Gratitude game as a family (name something for which you are grateful for each letter of the alphabet); see how many times you can say “thank you” to people during the day. Support an organization that sustains families, such as our local domestic violence shelter, Grace Smith House www.gracesmithhouse.org or Habitat for Humanity www.habitatdutchess.com

Watch for these videos every morning in your inbox, or check the  Vassar Temple YouTube Channel.

We hope that you will join in the celebration by lighting, and celebrating these mitzvot, in your own homes!

How to Light Chanukah Candles

You can also celebrate religious freedom by joining Women of the Wall’s “It’s My Right To Light” Campaign, which is fighting for the inclusion of women in Israel’s national Chanukiyah lighting ceremony at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

Don’t forget….Annual Chanukah Dinner and Service Friday 12/11
5:30 p.m. Annual pot-luck dinner. Bring a dairy dish for 12; Sisterhood will provide latkes, applesauce, challah, salad and beverages. Cost: $18 per family or $6 per individual. RSVP by Tuesday 12/8 to Roni Stein 223-5804 or roniagt99@aol.com Send your check to Vassar Temple Sisterhood with “Chanukah Dinner” on the memo line.

7:00 p.m. Our beautiful family-friendly Chanukah Menorah-Lighting Shabbat service, to which everyone is welcome and encouraged to bring a menorah and candles.

More Chanukah resources:

Union for Reform Judaism Chanukah Resources Page

My Jewish Learning Chanukah Resource Page

May your Chanukah be filled with light and joy, and may we all bring light and joy to those who need it most!

Eight Nights of Chanukah, Part II

Zoe Weinstein and Betty Gibbs celebrate the second night of Chanukah and the mitzvah of Tzedek (Justice) by writing their senators!

Watch Zoe and Betty’s Video!

Activity ideas:  Write a letter to an elected official or newspaper editor about an issue of justice; teach each other about a justice issue dear to us; make and decorate a family tzedakah box; give tzedakah to an organization that works for justice; join a campaign at Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism  www.rac.org

Watch for these videos every morning in your inbox, or check the  Vassar Temple YouTube Channel.

We hope that you will join in the celebration by lighting, and celebrating these mitzvot, in your own homes!

How to Light Chanukah Candles

You can also celebrate religious freedom by joining Women of the Wall’s “It’s My Right To Light” Campaign, which is fighting for the inclusion of women in Israel’s national Chanukiyah lighting ceremony at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

Don’t forget….Annual Chanukah Dinner and Service Friday 12/11
5:30 p.m. Annual pot-luck dinner. Bring a dairy dish for 12; Sisterhood will provide latkes, applesauce, challah, salad and beverages. Cost: $18 per family or $6 per individual. RSVP by Tuesday 12/8 to Roni Stein 223-5804 or roniagt99@aol.com Send your check to Vassar Temple Sisterhood with “Chanukah Dinner” on the memo line.

7:00 p.m. Our beautiful family-friendly Chanukah Menorah-Lighting Shabbat service, to which everyone is welcome and encouraged to bring a menorah and candles.

More Chanukah resources:

Union for Reform Judaism Chanukah Resources Page

My Jewish Learning Chanukah Resource Page

May your Chanukah be filled with light and joy, and may we all bring light and joy to those who need it most.

Eight Nights of Mitzvot, Part I

Introducing….

VASSAR TEMPLE CHANUKAH – 8 EIGHT NIGHTS OF MITZVOT

Chag Urim Sameach (Happy Festival of Lights)!

This Chanukah, the Vassar Temple Ritual Committee is performing Eight Mitzvot (Commandments) for Eight Nights of Chanukah.

Each night, a different member of our committee will be lighting the Chanukiyah (Chanukah menorah) and performing a special mitzvah for the day.

Watch for these videos every morning in your inbox, or check the  Vassar Temple YouTube Channel.

We hope that you will join in the celebration by lighting, and celebrating these mitzvot, in your own homes!

You can also celebrate religious freedom by joining Women of the Wall’s “It’s My Right To Light” Campaign, which is fighting for the inclusion of women in Israel’s national Chanukiyah lighting ceremony at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

May your Chanukah be filled with light and joy, and may we all bring light and joy to those who need it most.

Happy Chanukah,

Rabbi Leah R. Berkowitz

Sandra Mamis, Ritual Committee Chair, Vassar Temple

Video: Sandra Mamis and David Hecht explain the rituals of Chanukah, and the Jewish value of Nedivut (Generosity)

Activity ideas: Go shopping for a needy family; shop for a local “Toys for Tots” drive or for a food bank; visit an animal shelter and give them your old towels and sheets for bedding

Helpful Hints: How to Light Chanukah Candles

Don’t forget….Annual Chanukah Dinner and Service Friday 12/11
5:30 p.m. Annual pot-luck dinner. Bring a dairy dish for 12; Sisterhood will provide latkes, applesauce, challah, salad and beverages. Cost: $18 per family or $6 per individual. RSVP by Tuesday 12/8 to Roni Stein 223-5804 or roniagt99@aol.com Send your check to Vassar Temple Sisterhood with “Chanukah Dinner” on the memo line.

7:00 p.m. Our beautiful family-friendly Chanukah Menorah-Lighting Shabbat service, to which everyone is welcome and encouraged to bring a menorah and candles.

More Chanukah resources:

Union for Reform Judaism Chanukah Resources Page

My Jewish Learning Chanukah Resource Page

 

 

 

 

Eight Nights of Mitzvot, Part VIII

Ron Rosen and Joel and Sam Kelson celebrate the eighth night of Chanukah, and the Jewish value of Rachmanut (Compassion)

Watch Ron, Sam and Joel’s Video!

Activity ideas:  Volunteer at a food bank or similar nonprofit.  Vassar Temple supports Dutchess Outreach where we provide a meal at LunchBox on the first Sunday of every month.  Give out clean, new tube socks to people on the street asking for help; visit someone who is shut-in, if possible light the menorah with them; during the week of Chanukah give one dollar to every person you see begging (keep a stash of dollars just for them)…talk about how it felt at the end of the week.

Watch for these videos every morning in your inbox, or check the  Vassar Temple YouTube Channel.

We hope that you will join in the celebration by lighting, and celebrating these mitzvot, in your own homes!

How to Light Chanukah Candles

You can also celebrate religious freedom by joining Women of the Wall’s “It’s My Right To Light” Campaign, which is fighting for the inclusion of women in Israel’s national Chanukiyah lighting ceremony at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

More Chanukah resources:

Union for Reform Judaism Chanukah Resources Page

My Jewish Learning Chanukah Resource Page

May your Chanukah be filled with light and joy, and may we all bring light and joy to those who need it most!

A Human Being Is Always Dangerous

Cross-posted to This Is What a Rabbi Looks Like. My sermon in response to recent acts of gun violence. With thanks to Rabbi Rebecca Reice, who originally explained to me the concept of tam and mu’ad.

I didn’t want to talk about gun violence tonight. I actually started writing another sermon, one connecting the Torah portion to a book I was reading, which is one of my favorite ways to preach. But even as I wrote, there was a nagging feeling that I should be writing about the incidents in California and Colorado Springs this past week. I pushed the urge down, saying to myself that it’s too controversial to discuss this so early in my tenure here. That I’m too busy this week to do the topic justice. That I’m just not ready.

And then I heard myself say, “Finish the sermon you were writing. There will be another shooting. It’s not like you’ll miss your opportunity.” And that thought was too much for me to bear.

Three years ago, almost to the week, I stood on the bimah in North Carolina and mourned for the young victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting. Our parasha, like this one, was from the Joseph narrative, and I spoke about Jacob’s perceived loss of his son and the unimaginably terrible pain of losing a child. I urged my community to take action to prevent future massacres. And I prayed, quite fiercely, that I would never have to give a sermon like that again.

And here we are.

It isn’t one particularly earth-shattering tragedy that has pushed me to speak this evening, the way the Sandy Hook shooting did three years ago. It is not that one of the recent shootings targeted a women’s health clinic, which touches on issues close to my heart. It is not even that, despite all their prayers and statements of support, our lawmakers failed to pass any sensible gun legislation in the wake of these attacks. It is that there have been so many shootings in the last year that I no longer even feel the need to click on the headlines.

There have been 12,236 deaths from gun violence in 2015, and nearly twice that number of gun-related injuries. And the year is not over.

The British journalist Dan Hodges put it best when he said: “In retrospect Sandy Hook marked the end of the US gun control debate. Once America decided killing children was bearable, it was over.” Gun violence has become the white noise in the background of American society. And that is unacceptable.

Gun violence photoRabbi Jeff Salkin writes that silence is not an option in this situation, nor are sending our prayers and thoughts adequate. “Prayer and good thoughts,” he writes, “are too easy. They are cheap. I want to hear screaming. I want to hear crying. I want to hear moaning.”

Lamentation is a timeless and appropriate Jewish response to senseless destruction. But that is also not enough. Our tradition demands that, when our fellow human beings are in danger, we take action.

This is not a left or right issue, or at least, it shouldn’t be. This is a human issue. This is an American issue. And this is a Jewish issue.

This is a Jewish issue, not because the Bible preaches non-violence. The Bible is loaded with violence. It is not a Jewish issue because the Bible advocates peace and tolerance. The Bible demands war and conquest and the smashing of foreign idols.

This is a Jewish issue, because the Bible is a book that demands the taking of responsibility, as individuals, and as a community, for that which has the potential to do harm. And strangely enough, we learn this from the Torah’s teachings on animal husbandry.

We read in Exodus that if an ox gores a person, the ox is put to death, and the owner is not held accountable. However, if the owner was previously aware that the ox was a danger to human beings, the owner, too, would be put to death, because the owner did not protect people from an animal the owner knew to be dangerous (Ex. 21:28-29).

This leads to a discussion in the Mishnah about how we interact with animals that are safe (tam) verses animals that are known to be dangerous (mu’ad). The distinction is important, because if an animal is mu’ad, its owner is responsible for keeping it from causing people harm, and held accountable, even to the point of capital punishment, if that animal hurts someone.

The rabbis ask: What is a tam [animal], and what is one which is mu’ad?  “A mu’ad [animal] is any one about which people have given testimony for three days. And a tam one is that which has refrained [from doing damage] on three days,” the words of R. Judah.  R. Meir says, “A mu’ad animal is one against which people have given testimony for three times.  And a tam one is any which infants or nurslings can touch without its goring them” (M. Bava Kamma 2:4).

Some species of animal are always considered mu’ad, unless they can be trained, while others are considered mu’ad only for certain behaviors that are typical to their species: kicking, pushing, or eating something it is known to eat (M. Bava Kamma 1:4).

A firearm may not be an animal. But a firearm is, without question, mu’ad.

Firearms have not gone three days without doing damage. In fact, only 336 days into the year, there had been 355 mass shootings, more than one for every day of the year. On Wednesday, the day of the San Bernadino shooting, there was also a shooting in Savannah, GA, which killed one woman and injured three men, and barely made the news.

Firearms are not something a child can touch without injury. A study by the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Vermont finds that 110 children under 14 are killed accidentally by guns each year, while another study estimates that seven children and teens are shot to death each day, whether accidentally or on purpose.

And unlike a mu’ad animal, guns are only tam, safe, in the most particular of circumstances: in the right hands, with the proper training, and with every possible safety measure. And unlike a mu’ad animal, which might be used for agriculture or transportation, a firearm, particularly an assault weapon, does not have any purpose other than to kill living beings, specifically humans.

This does not mean that there is no place for gun ownership in our society, though I personally wish that I lived in a world where gun ownership was rare. Something mu’ad is not something that cannot exist and must be destroyed. Rather, it is something that must be contained and regulated in order to ensure public safety. And if that cannot be accomplished, the owner of that which is mu’ad is held responsible for the damage caused.

As they conclude their conversation about which animals are tam and mu’ad, the rabbis say something chilling: A human being is always mu’ad, whether s/he causes damage unintentionally or intentionally, whether awake or asleep.  If a person blinds another person’s eye or breaks another person’s property, s/he pays full damages (M. Bava Kamma 2:6).

This tells us something heartbreaking that we probably already knew about ourselves: we can be dangerous, and we frequently hurt others. But this passage also reminds us of something vitally important. We are responsible for the damage we cause even when it is unintentional. We are responsible even when our eyes are closed. We are responsible even when we don’t click on the headline.

We often say that guns don’t kill people, people kill people. But we must amend that. People who make it easier for dangerous people to obtain guns kill people.

We may not own firearms ourselves, or we may own them and care for them in a safe and law-abiding manner. We may not provide firearms to others. But we are citizens of this nation, where the gun murder rate is 20 times that of any other developed country. We are citizens of a nation where, even in the wake of 20 children being shot in their elementary school classrooms, an assault weapons ban could not be passed in our Senate. We are citizens of a nation where, even after five mass shootings in a seven-day period, no legislation regarding background checks could even be discussed. If we knowingly allow this epidemic of gun violence to continue, when we have the power to stop it, we are just as responsible as the person who is pulling the trigger. We know that we are mu’ad. We cannot neglect our responsibility to protect people from harm.

I will not say definitively what each of us needs to do. We are a politically diverse community, and I know that we differ in our opinions about the root of this problem. I will only say that, as Jews, we cannot do nothing. We must hold ourselves accountable, and we must hold our government accountable as well.

If we believe that this is a mental health issue, we must demand increased funding for inpatient and outpatient mental health care in this country.

If we believe this is an illegal trafficking issue, then we must demand greater enforcement of firearm trafficking laws.

If we believe that certain weapons are always mu’ad, we must demand bans on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines.

And if we believe, as the rabbis did, that human beings are always mu’ad, we must demand stricter regulations on who can purchase a firearm and when. For instance, the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism is currently working on legislation that will make it more difficult for stalkers and domestic abusers to purchase weapons. Currently, such provisions only apply to those who have abused their spouses, not to those who abuse their domestic or dating partners, which leaves nearly half of the potential victims completely unprotected.

After Shabbat, I urge you to visit the Religious Action Center to show your support for this, and other, legislation aimed at preventing gun violence. NFTY, our youth movement, also has a campaign for gun violence prevention.

No, this will not stop every mass shooting, or every act of domestic violence, or every purposeful or accidental shooting of a child. But if our actions could prevent even one unnecessary death or injury, why would we not act? And if we know the dangers posed by our existing laws, and we do not act to prevent even one shooting, what does that make us?

It makes us mu’ad.

Further Reading and Action:

On Guns, We’re Not Even Trying

Are Bullet Proof Blankets the Solution?

Gun Violence By the Numbers

Brady Campaign to End Gun Violence

Gun Violence Archive