Busy second day at the Biennial

We started today by attending the morning prayer service using Visual T’filah. I wanted to see how they supplemented the information on the screen to make for an engaging service. The service was run by a young (female) Rabbi and (male) Cantor, both with beautiful voices. The Cantor played a guitar during half of the service and a piano during the 2nd half.

Next I attended a session on the “Intentional Interim Rabbi” where I learned about the CCAR training now required of all interim Rabbis, and how the interim rabbi not only helps with transition from the prior rabbi, but also helps the congregation determine the profile for what they’d like in a new Rabbi. Typically hired for a 1 year period, the intentional interim rabbi is typically an empty-nester who likes traveling to different areas, helping congregations in need, and then moving on. It was stressed that the interim year is not a disruption, but is an opportunity for the congregation to reexamine who we are, identify traits that we feel we absolutely require, and help the congregation arrive at consensus. Where there’s conflict, the interim doesn’t take sides … he/she needs to hear from everyone and help all arrive at consensus. It was mentioned that congregations who don’t hire a full rabbi rather than an interim will often take on a second rabbi search within the next year. So planning is very important.

The session on Visual T’filah was particularly enlightening. The temple purchased the CCAR model service based on Mishkan T’filah and we enhanced it to meet our needs. This session focused on how to create new, fresh visuals for services, and create unique services for specific situations, like a Martin Luther King service, or tailoring a Saturday morning service to highlight the interests of a Bar/Bat Mitzvah. One of the panel participants was Rabbi Danny Dreskin of Woodlands Community Synagogue in White Plains. Rabbi Dreskin started the Visual service trend and Visual T’filah is used regularly at his temple with very wide acceptance. After speaking with him following the session, he invited us to visit his temple on a night when they’re using Visual T’filah to observe how they conduct the service using this medium.

I also attended a session on Best Practices for fundraising. During this session, issues related to marketing and messaging, running fund development, and running an annual campaign were discussed, as well as how to inspire donors to give. A panel of reform synagogue development professionals offered advice and answered questions. A common theme throughout the entire discussion was the need to make connections with everyone at the temple, to cultivate members, set goals and to get the message out … to always tell our story about what’s involved in running the temple and why additional fundraising is necessary. The role of clergy was also discussed, how clergy relationships with potential donors is very powerful. Build relationships via life events, engage new congregants, and develop appropriate goals on why funding is required, and how the donor will benefit. While I felt many of the suggestions were more appropriate for larger congregations, the basic principles apply regardless of the number of families.

On a side note, I got to meet Rabbi Larry Hoffman (Joel’s dad), who was doing a book signing at the URJ Bookstore. Rabbi Hoffman’s wife was there as well. They are both looking forward to visiting Vassar Temple for the Shabbaton in the Spring, to see the temple that Joel has been raving about!

This evening’s Plenary session will feature Rabbi Rick Jacobs, URJ President and other speakers, followed by music entertainment featuring Josh Nelson and Dan Nichols.

Bob Abrams

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1 Comment

  1. Perla Kaufman

     /  December 12, 2013

    You are not wasting time for sure…..looking forward to lots of reports…LOL

    Reply

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